A day in the life of…Richard Evans

Richard Evans

Hello, my name is Richard Evans. I’m employed as a research fellow and am currently undertaking a part-time PhD at the University of Wolverhampton. I first joined the research group in 1998 having obtained BA (Hons) Linguistics from the University of Wales (Bangor) and an MSc in Cognitive Science and Natural Language at the University of Edinburgh. I love the challenges of computational linguistics and natural language processing, and the creativity that those challenges inspire. Continue reading

A day in the life of…Rohit Gupta

Rohit

My name is Rohit Gupta. I am employed as an Early Stage Researcher and I am pursing my PhD under the EXPERT project at the University of Wolverhampton. My research area is Translation Memory matching and retrieval. A translation memory is basically an archive of previously translated segments. Translation memory tools aim at retrieving these previously stored translations for reuse. My research involves searching the translation memory to get the best matches. Continue reading

A day in the life of…Dr Michael Oakes

Michael Oakes

Hello. I am Michael Oakes, and I have been a Reader in the Research Group in Computational Linguistics for about a year and a half. Previously I spent 13 years at the University of Sunderland, teaching computing in general, so now it feels exciting to be in a group dedicated specifically to Natural Language Processing. After starting here, I took a few more months to finish my book “Literary Detective Work on the Computer”. The book started way back in 2008, when Prof. Mitkov suggested that I write a book for the book series he edits for the John Benjamins Publishing Company. The book was to be centred around computational stylometry, the computer analysis of writing style. He suggested that studies of disputed authorship, plagiarism and spam (unwarranted email campaigns) should considered together, partly because they often uncover fraudulent behaviour, but also because they all consider the question of where a text originally came from, and how similar one text is to another. Continue reading

Can Translation Memories afford not to use paraphrasing?

Screen_Shot_2015-05-11_at_16.54.57.resizedResearch carried out in the EXPERT project between researchers from University of Wolverhampton and Saarland University, Germany is being presented at the European Association for Machine Translation 2015 conference. The work shows how paraphrasing can help the task of translators who use translation memories. Continue reading

A day in the life of…Victoria Yaneva

Hello! My name is Victoria Yaneva and I have been a PhD student at RIILP for already two and a half years. My research investigates the reading difficulties of people diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder and how NLP tools could be used to aid the reading comprehension of these individuals. I first became interested in this topic while doing a placement at the research group as a part of the FIRST project, which was dedicated to the development of an automatic text simplification tool for readers with autism in English, Spanish and Bulgarian. Unlike the majority of the PhD students here, my background is in Psychology, which is why my supervisory team is interdisciplinary, comprising of researchers from the fields of both Computational Linguistics (Professor Ruslan Mitkov and Dr. Irina Temnikova) and Psychology (Professor Kenneth Manktelow). Continue reading

Manifestospeak: What can linguistic analysis tell us about politicians and their attitudes?

By Patrick Hanks and Sara Može
Research Institute of Information and Language Processing
University of Wolverhampton

No doubt every politically conscious person in Britain has a pretty good idea by now of the main issues selected by the various political parties fighting each other for votes in the upcoming General Election. An obvious way of finding out what those issues are is to read the manifestos of each of the parties.

But linguistic analysis can tell us more than the politicians ever intended to reveal.  Linguists working on the DVC project at the University of Wolverhampton have been using corpus-analysis tools such as Adam Kilgarriff’s Sketch Engine to explore the language used in the manifestos of four parties: Continue reading