Category Archives: news

Jobs in translation technology at the Research Group in Computational Linguistics

The Research Group in Computational Linguistics at the University of Wolverhampton is currently recruiting a Reader in Translation Technology (permanent) and a Research Fellow in Translation Technology (3 year position with the possibility of extension). The purpose of these posts is to  strengthen the research group by enhancing its research and publications in the field of translation technology. The appointed candidates will be expected to produce REF-returnable outputs, attract external income, seek industrial collaborations, teach at Masters level and supervise PhD students. Continue reading

Syntactic complexity sign tagger demo released

The successfully completed FIRST project has developed various components which help users to analyse the complexity of texts and rewrite texts in order to make them more accessible for readers with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD). These components were integrated in the OpenBook tool, but they cannot be used in isolation. In an attempt to make some of this technology available for other researchers, we started a process of releasing some of the components individually. The first component to be released as a web demo is the syntactic
complexity sign tagger. This is a tool that assigns words and punctuation marks from a predefined set to categories indicating their syntactic linking and bounding functions. Some of these categories are used by our sentence rewriting algorithm. Continue reading

Watch the full AUTOR ITV News interview with Victoria Yaneva and Autism West Midlands

What is AUTOR?

AUTOR is a text-processing tool which can give you feedback on how easy or difficult your text is for a person with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Furthermore, AUTOR can help you with making your text more accessible by suggesting ways to rewrite it, as well as suggesting images or definitions which could help the reader understand it better. AUTOR is based on scientific research involving adult participants who were diagnosed with autism. Continue reading

Victoria takes to the floor at TEDx Brum

PhD student Victoria Yaneva recently showcased the work of the University’s Research Group in Computational Linguistics (RGCL) and her own research into improving reading for people with autism at the TEDx Brum event at the Town Hall, Birmingham.

The TEDx Program is designed to help communities, organisations and individuals to spark conversation and connection through local TED-like experiences; TEDx events – often with a live presenters and TED Talks videos – are inspirational, prestigious to speak at and well regarded internationally. Continue reading

PhD studentship in NLP approaches to estimating text difficulty

*** Closing date 23 May 2016 ***

The Research Group in Computational Linguistics (http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk) at the Research Institute of Information and Language Processing of the University of Wolverhampton invites applications for a 3-year University of Wolverhampton PhD studentship in the area of estimating text difficulty.

The proposed topic of the PhD research will be to develop a Natural Language Processing (NLP) methodology to predict text difficulty not only at the grammatical level (e.g. lexical or syntactic complexity) but also at the level of text content: the complexity of concepts mentioned in a specific text and the relationships between those concepts. Much of the research on quantifying text complexity so far has relied on readability measures which have often been criticised for being inaccurate or unreliable. Continue reading

10 Reasons why you should attend the EXPERT Business Showcase…

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EXPERT (EXPloiting Empirical appRoaches to Translation) is a Marie Curie funded Initial Training Network project that aims to train young researchers, namely Early Stage Researchers (ESRs) and Experienced Researchers, to promote the research, development and use of hybrid language translation technologies.

On Monday 9th May 2016 the EXPERT project will hold its final event in the form of a Business Showcase, bringing together leading lights of the translation arena from both Academia and Industry.

The event will be hosted at the headquarters of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations in Rome. If you would like to attend this free event please contact Iain Mansell via iain.mansell@wlv.ac.uk.

10 Reasons why you should attend the EXPERT Business Showcase… Continue reading

The programme for the 2nd Workshop on Natural Language Processing for Translation Memories

NLP4TM2016Programme
The programme and the abstracts of the presentations of the 2nd Workshop on  Natural Language Processing for Translation Memories to be held in conjunction with LREC 2016 is available on the workshops website. It features three invited speakers, four research papers, a shared task and a round table. We hope to see you in Portorož.

 

Special Issue of the Machine Translation journal: Natural Language Processing for Translation Memories

Guest editors:

  • Constantin Orasan (University of Wolverhampton, UK)
  • Marcello Federico (FBK, Italy)

Submission deadline: May 15, 2016

1. Call For Papers

Translation Memories (TM) are amongst the most widely used tools by professional translators. The underlying idea of TMs is that a translator should benefit as much as possible from previous translations by being able to retrieve the way in which a similar sentence was translated before. Moreover, the usage of TMs aims to guarantee that new translations follow the client’s specified style and terminology. Despite the fact that the core idea of these systems relies on comparing segments (typically of sentence length) from the document to be translated with segments from previous translations, most of the existing TM systems hardly use any language processing for this. Instead of addressing this issue, most of the work on translation memories focused on improving the user experience by allowing processing of a variety of document formats, intuitive user interfaces, etc. Continue reading