Category Archives: news

Journal of Natural Language Engineering: Call for special issue

The area of Natural Language Engineering, and Natural Language Processing in general, is following the trend of many other areas in becoming highly specialised, with a number of application-orientated and narrow-domain topics emerging or growing in importance. These developments, often coinciding with a lack of related literature, necessitate and warrant the publication of specialised volumes focusing on a specific topic of interest to the Natural Language Processing (NLP) research community.

The Journal of Natural Language Engineering (JNLE), which now features six 160-page issues per year and has increased its impact factor for third consecutive year, invites proposals for special issues on a competitive basis regarding any topics surrounding applied NLP which have emerged as important recent developments and that have attracted the attention of a number of researchers or research groups. In recent years, Calls for Proposals for special issues have resulted in high-quality outputs and this year we look forward to another successful competition.

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RIILP Annual PhD Poster Presentations

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Last week, the RGCL and SCRG PhD Students presented their research to their peers and staff members from across the University. The posters were well received.

Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group

David Foster: ‘Determining YouTube Video Popularity: Analysing YouTube User Behaviours’

Kuk Aduku: ‘ Do Patents Cite Conference Papers as Often as Journal Articles in Engineering? An Investigation of Four Fields’

 

Research Group in Computational Linguistics

Mohammad Alharbu: ‘Readability Assessment for Arabic as a Second Language’

Najah Albaqawi: ‘Gender Variation in Gulf Pidgin Arabic’

This poster is an attempt to provide a quantitative variationist analysis on variability in GPA morpho-syntax (Arabic definiteness markers, Arabic conjunction markers, object or possessive pronoun, GPA copula, and  agreement in the verb phrase and the noun phrase) which aims to discover the potential effect of the three factors: male and female gender, speakers’ first language, and number of years spent in the Gulf.

Richard Evans: ‘Sentence Rewriting for Language Processing’

This poster provided an overview of the OB1 sentence simplification system. In this approach, the functions of various textual markers of syntactic complexity (conjunctions, relative pronouns, and punctuation marks) are identified and used to inform an iterative rule-based sentence transformation process.

Ahmed Omer: ‘New Techniques For Finding Authorship in Arabic Texts’

The degree of stylistic difference between a pair of documents can then be found by any of a number of measures which compare the sets of linguistic features for each document. In general, The technique is used to first find a set of linguistic features and a difference measure which successfully discriminates between texts known to be either by author A or author B. Then texts of unknown authorship are compared against these texts to see whether their writing style is more similar to author A or author B.

Omid Rohanian: ‘ NLP Approaches to estimating Text Difficulty’

I am exploring NLP approaches in investigating text difficulty at the level of concepts.

Shiva Taslimpoor: ‘Automatic Extraction and Translation of Multiword Expressions’

We employ the state-of-the-art word embedding approaches to automatically identify and translate idiosyncratic Multiword Expressions.

Short term job opportunity: Research Associate – AUTOR

This post is being offered on a casual basis until 31 July 2017

The Research Group in Computational Linguistics at the University of Wolverhampton is currently recruiting a Research Associate to conduct research on the AUTOR project which aims to help people with Autism read and understand text better (for more info on this project, please visit http://autor4autism.com/).

As a Research Associate you will use relevant NLP technologies such as lexical, syntactic, and semantic processing to design and implement applications that can help AUTOR improve its core mission by developing educational assistance for people with autism.

You should hold a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree, but ideally a PhD in Information Science, Computer Science or Natural Language Processing and experience in software development or employment in these fields. You should have experience of language technologies and resources and be willing to work as part of an extended team to research computational linguistics approaches to support the development of education-assistance tools for people with autism. Knowledge of machine learning is required.

Interview dates to be confirmed. Start of the post to be agreed with the successful candidates. This is a temporary, zero hour contract.

For informal discussion about the role please contact Dr Victoria Yaneva (v.yaneva@wlv.ac.uk).

For more information and how to apply online: click here

Jobs in translation technology at the Research Group in Computational Linguistics

The Research Group in Computational Linguistics at the University of Wolverhampton is currently recruiting a Reader in Translation Technology (permanent) and a Research Fellow in Translation Technology (3 year position with the possibility of extension). The purpose of these posts is to  strengthen the research group by enhancing its research and publications in the field of translation technology. The appointed candidates will be expected to produce REF-returnable outputs, attract external income, seek industrial collaborations, teach at Masters level and supervise PhD students. Continue reading

Syntactic complexity sign tagger demo released

The successfully completed FIRST project has developed various components which help users to analyse the complexity of texts and rewrite texts in order to make them more accessible for readers with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD). These components were integrated in the OpenBook tool, but they cannot be used in isolation. In an attempt to make some of this technology available for other researchers, we started a process of releasing some of the components individually. The first component to be released as a web demo is the syntactic
complexity sign tagger. This is a tool that assigns words and punctuation marks from a predefined set to categories indicating their syntactic linking and bounding functions. Some of these categories are used by our sentence rewriting algorithm. Continue reading

Watch the full AUTOR ITV News interview with Victoria Yaneva and Autism West Midlands

What is AUTOR?

AUTOR is a text-processing tool which can give you feedback on how easy or difficult your text is for a person with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Furthermore, AUTOR can help you with making your text more accessible by suggesting ways to rewrite it, as well as suggesting images or definitions which could help the reader understand it better. AUTOR is based on scientific research involving adult participants who were diagnosed with autism. Continue reading