Category Archives: Seminars

RGCL welcomes Eveline Wandl-Vogt

It was a great privilege to welcome Eveline Wandl-Vogt from the Austrian Academy of Sciences to RGCL this week.  Eveline is a Research Manager from the Lexicography Laboratory at the Academy who came to RGCL to discuss possible future collaborations with members of the Research Group. During her stay, Eveline carried out a seminar on her research for members of the group.

Title: Computational Linguistics and Digital Humanities- Designing Joint Discovery on the example of lexicography laboratory @ ACDH @ AAS

Abstract: Continue reading

Seminar: A Comparative Model for Wordplay Analysis and Translation

Ralitsa DemirkovaRalitsa Demirkova, St. Cyril and St. Methodius University of Veliko Turnovo
Title:
A Comparative Model for Wordplay Analysis and Translation
Date and time: Wednesday 78h June, 2pm
Room: MC232, City Campus

Abstract:

The presentation focuses on wordplay as a stylistic device in British children’s literature. A comparative analysis model for wordplays and their respective translations is proposed. It is based on Attardo’s General Theory of Verbal Humour (GTVH)[i] and Zhuravlyova[ii]’s cognitive mechanisms of wordplays. It uses six parameters on both micro-structural (linguistic) and macro-structural (cognitive) levels which serve as a basis for comparison. Continue reading

Seminar: An Interpreter’s Wish List

20160607_133604Elena Errico, University of Genoa
Title:
An Interpreter’s Wish List
Date and time: Tuesday 7th June, 1.30pm
Room: MC232, City Campus

Abstract:

Interpreting is a very challenging cognitive activity not least because it requires professionals to take translation decisions under very strict time constraints and while performing several Continue reading

Seminar: Automatic Extraction and Translation of Multiword Expressions

 20160309_171521

Speaker: Shiva Taslimipoor
Title:
Automatic Extraction and Translation of Multiword Expressions
Date and time: Wednesday, March 9th, 2pm
Room: MD083, City Campus

Abstract: Multiword expressions (MWEs) are defined as idiosyncratic interpretations that cross word boundaries or spaces, e.g. frying pan, take a look and take part. They have distinct syntactic and semantic properties that call for special treatment within a computational system. Continue reading

Seminar: Taxonomies for semantic tagging: how large do they need to be?

Speaker: Dr Paul Rayson, Lancaster University
Title: Taxonomies for semantic tagging: how large do they need to be?
Date and time: Tuesday Feb 9th, 2pm
Room: MI301, City Campus

Abstract: In this presentation, I will describe joint research carried out in the recently completed Samuels project (www.gla.ac.uk/samuels/) in which we have applied automatic semantic analysis to two very large corpora around 1-2 billion words each: Continue reading

Spanish translators share their expertise with RGCL

3 MariasFor the past month, RGCL has hosted three Spanish translators who visited to carry out research and collaborate with members of the group. Pilar Castillo, María Luisa Rodríguez and Mar Ogea are all affiliated with the University of Cordoba in Spain, as well as working as freelance translators specialising in various fields. In addition to drawing on the facilities and research materials available here at Wolverhampton University, they shared the details of their own work with the group over the course of three seminars, information about which can be found below. We wish them the very best in their future endeavours.  Continue reading

Seminar: The new perspective on language study as provided by Transformational Grammar

Speaker: Snezhana Boyanova (Veliko Turnovo University, Bulgaria)
Date: 9 June 2015
Location: MC131
Time: 3.15pm

boyanovaAbstract: Chomsky offered a different perspective to the study of the language – studying the process of production rather than the ready product. He was looking for language universals that could be applied to any language. Language is viewed as a genetic predisposition, a genetic chip that enables a child to acquire a language. It is an instinct that we are born with. The acquisition of language cannot be explained through imitation. Every sentence that we produce is unique – it is a unique combination of words, and meanings, and connotations, and context, situation, audience, speaker, etc. No two sentences are identical in this context. So imitation is too simplistic as an explanation of language acquisition. Language production is a creative process. Creativity and linguistic intuition are the two basic skills underlying language production. Continue reading