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Technologies for Translation and Interpreting: Challenges and Latest Developments

Aleks Sandor Milovanovic and Dora Murgu, Interprefy

The backstage of a hybrid event – a complex string puppet called RSIBOX

15 October 2021

Abstract:

Hybrid events have been at the core of Interprefy since its creation in 2014 when remote simultaneous interpreting (RSI) was only accepted as a sideline to in-person events, where complex language pairs or space restrictions could require expanding the pool of in-person interpreting teams to one that also included remote participation. The real breakthrough came in 2018 when Interprefy won their first UN tender and the International Seabed Authority signed on with Interprefy as the first UN agency to replace onsite interpreters for their major meetings with remote interpreters for a whooping cost savings of almost a million dollars. From there it went strength to strength and culminated at WHA73 which was watched by a total of 800 million people worldwide, being the first world health assembly that was fully online in the history of World Health Organizatio).

At Interprefy we have developed our own plug and play equipment (RSIBOX) which can be used onsite for seamless bridge between AV and Remote setups. The RSIBOX originated from experimentation in hybrid environments and is a piece of hardware that has been used on most football championships, Euro 2020 being the most prominent example.

During this webinar Aleks and Dora will speak about what goes on backstage for a seamless hybrid event and discuss the technology behind our RSIBOX. This webinar is oriented at EM TTI students who have a particular interest in interpreting technology, AV systems and hardware.

Bios:

Dora Murgu. Romanian born and Spanish bred, Dora started her career as a conference interpreter. She soon transitioned into the backstage of interpretation services after creating a pioneering training program for OPI which she later taught at universities across Spain for over six years. She has presented several papers at major industry conferences and published articles on interpreting quality management, interpreter training and OPI service provision in Spain. She has worked for major LSPs and RSI providers for the past 13 years and currently holds the position of Interpreter Engagement Manager at Interprefy, one of the leading RSI platforms on the market. When she’s not immersed in the world of interpreters she threads the waters of the Arabian Gulf with her SUP board in Dubai, where she lives with her family.

Aleks Sandor Milovanovic. Raised in South Africa, Hungarian citizen Aleks Sandor moved to Switzerland in 2014. As one of the most senior members of Interprefy (the 3rd to be precise) he built the original Operations Team for which he was responsible during the first startup phase of the company. Shortly before COVID hit he created the Special Operations Department to more efficiently respond to a high demand of very sensitive clients such as the UN, IMF and UEFA. The innovation that stemmed from his leadership included the Interprefy Gateway solution which was first used at the Google PES 2018 and notably at the UN Hybrid Rooms setup which enabled UN to resume their operations after nearly three months of meetings without interpretation. In his spare time, Aleks enjoys kayaking and cycling around lake Zurich.

PhD studentship in Translation Technology

Closing date 20th June 2018, Skype interviews 26th June 2018

The Research Group in Computational Linguistics (http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk) at the University of Wolverhampton invites applications for a 3-year PhD studentship in the area of translation technology. This PhD studentship is part of a larger university investment which includes other PhD students and members of staff with the aim to strengthen the existing research undertaken by members of the group in this area. This funded student bursary consist of a stipend towards living expenses (£14,500 per year) and remission of fees.

We invite applications in the area of translation technology defined in the broadest sense possible and ranging from advanced methods in machine translation to user studies which involves the use of technology in the translation process. We welcome proposals focusing on Natural Language Processing techniques for translation memory systems and translation tools in general. Given the current research interests of the group and its focus on computational approaches, we would be interested in topics including but not limited to:

– Enhancing retrieval and matching from translation memories with linguistic information – The use of deep learning (and in general, statistical) techniques in translation memories – (Machine) translation of user generated content – The use of machine translation in cross-lingual applications (with particular interest in sentiment analysis, automatic summarisation and question answering) – Phraseology and computational treatment of multi-word expressions in machine translation and translation memory systems – Quality estimation for translation professionals

Other topics will also be considered as long as they align with the interests of the group. The appointed student is expected to work on a project that has a significant computational component. For this reason we expect that the successful candidate will have good background in computer science and programming.

The application deadline is 20th June 2018 and Skype interviews with the shortlisted candidates are planned for the 26th June. The starting date of the PhD position is as soon as possible after the offer is made.

The successful applicant must have:

– A good honours degree or equivalent in Computational Linguistics, Computer Science, Translation studies or Linguistics – A strong background in Programming and Statistics/ Mathematics or in closely related areas (if relevant to the proposed topic). – Experience in Computational Linguistics / Natural Language Processing, including statistical, Machine Learning and Deep Learning, applications to Natural Language Processing. – Experience with translation technology – Experience with programming languages such as Python, Java or R is a plus – An IELTS certificate with a score of 6.5 is required from candidates whose native language is not English. If a certificate is not available at the time of application, the successful candidate must be able to obtain it within one month from the offer being made.

Candidates from both UK/EU and non-EU can apply. We encourage applications from female candidates.

Applications must include:

1. A curriculum vitae indicating degrees obtained, courses covered, publications, relevant work experience and names of two referees that could be contacted if necessary

2. A research statement which outlines the topics of interest. More information about the expected structure of the research statement can be found at https://www.wlv.ac.uk/media/departments/star-office/documents/Guidelines-for-completion-of-Research-Statement.doc

Information on RGCL:

Established by Prof Mitkov in 1998, the research group in Computational Linguistics delivers cutting-edge research in a number of NLP areas. The results from the latest Research Evaluation Framework confirm the research group in Computational Linguistics as one of the top performers in UK research with its research defined as ‘internationally leading, internationally excellent and internationally recognised’. The research group has recently completed successfully the coordination of the EXPERT project a successful EC Marie Curie Initial Training Network promoting research, development and use of data-driven technologies in machine translation and translation technology (http://expert-itn.eu).


Contact:

To find out more, please contact:

Dr Constantin Orasan (Reader in Computational Linguistics , Deputy Head of the Research Group in Computational Linguistics)

Research Group in Computational Linguistics Research Institute of Information and Language Processing University of Wolverhampton MC139 Stafford Street Wolverhampton WV1 1LY

Tel. +44 (0) 1902 321630 Email: C.Orasan at wlv.ac.uk Homepage: http://dinel.org.uk

One PhD studentship in Translation Technology

Deadline: 30th Nov 2017

The Research Group in Computational Linguistics at University of Wolverhampton invites applications for a 3-year PhD studentships in the area of translation technology. This PhD studentship is part of a university investment which also includes the appointment of a senior lecturer, a research fellow and another PhD student with the aim to strengthen the existing research undertaken by members of the group in this area. This bursary consists of a stipend towards living expenses

(£14,500 per year) and remission of fees.

We invite applications in the area of translation technology defined in the broadest sense possible and ranging from advanced methods in machine translation to other ways of involving technology in the translation process. The proposals should focus on Natural Language Processing techniques for translation memory systems and translation tools in general. Given the current research interests of the group and its focus on computational approaches, we would be interested in topics including but not limited to:

  • Enhancing retrieval and matching from translation memories with linguistic information
  • The use of deep learning (and in general, statistical) techniques in translation memories
  • (Machine) translation of user generated content
  • The use of machine translation in cross-lingual applications
  • Phraseology and computational treatment of multi-word expressions in machine translation and translation memory systems
  • Quality estimation for translation professionals

Other topics will be also considered as long as they align with the interests of the group. The appointed student is expected to work on a project that has a significant computational component. For this reason we expect that the successful candidate will have good background in computer science and programming.

The application deadline is 30 November 2017 and the interviews will take place in the first half of December by Skype. The starting date of the PhD position is 1st Jan 2018 or any time as soon as possible after that.

A successful applicant must have:

  • A good honours degree or equivalent in Computational Linguistics, Computer Science, Translation studies or Linguistics
  • A strong programming and statistical / Mathematical background or closely related areas
  • Experience in Computational Linguistics / Natural Language Processing, including at least some of the following Statistical Processing, Machine Learning and Deep Learning, applications to Natural Language Processing.
  • Experience with translation technology
  • Experience with programming languages such as Python, Java or R.
  • If not native speaker a IELTS certificate with a score of 6.5. If a certificate is not available at the time of application, the successful candidate must be able to obtain it within one month from the offer being made.

Candidates from both UK/EU and non-EU can apply.

Applications must include:

These documents will have to be sent by email before the deadline to Amanda Bloore (A.Bloore@wlv.ac.uk). Informal enquiries can be sent to Constantin Orasan (C.Orasan@wlv.ac.uk)

Established by Prof Mitkov in 1998, the research group in Computational Linguistics delivers cutting-edge research in a number of NLP areas.

The results from the latest Research Evaluation Framework confirm the research group in Computational Linguistics as one of the top performers in UK research with its research defined as ‘internationally leading, internationally excellent and internationally recognised’. The research group has recently completed successfully the coordination of the EXPERT project a successful EC Marie Curie Initial Training Network promoting research, development and use of data-driven technologies in machine translation and translation technology (http://expert-itn.eu)

Short term job opportunity: Research Associate – AUTOR

This post is being offered on a casual basis until 31 July 2017

The Research Group in Computational Linguistics at the University of Wolverhampton is currently recruiting a Research Associate to conduct research on the AUTOR project which aims to help people with Autism read and understand text better (for more info on this project, please visit http://autor4autism.com/).

As a Research Associate you will use relevant NLP technologies such as lexical, syntactic, and semantic processing to design and implement applications that can help AUTOR improve its core mission by developing educational assistance for people with autism.

You should hold a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree, but ideally a PhD in Information Science, Computer Science or Natural Language Processing and experience in software development or employment in these fields. You should have experience of language technologies and resources and be willing to work as part of an extended team to research computational linguistics approaches to support the development of education-assistance tools for people with autism. Knowledge of machine learning is required.

Interview dates to be confirmed. Start of the post to be agreed with the successful candidates. This is a temporary, zero hour contract.

For informal discussion about the role please contact Dr Victoria Yaneva (v.yaneva@wlv.ac.uk).

For more information and how to apply online: click here