Dr. Aline Villavicencio to visit from the University of Essex

Dr. Aline Villavicencio from the University of Essex (UK) and Federal university of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil) is visiting RGCL in April. She will be giving a talk on Identifying Idiomatic Language with Distributional Semantic Models on the 19th April 2018, abstract below. If you are interested in attending the talk please contact A.Harper2@wlv.ac.uk for more details.

Identifying Idiomatic Language with Distributional Semantic Models
Precise natural language understanding requires adequate treatments both of single words and of larger units. However, expressions like compound nouns may display idiomaticity, and while a police car is a car used by the police, a loan shark is not a fish that can be borrowed. Therefore it is important to identify which expressions are idiomatic, and which are not, as the latter can be interpreted from a combination of the meanings of their component words while the former cannot. In this talk I discuss the ability of distributional semantic models (DSMs) to capture idiomaticity in compounds, by means of a large-scale multilingual evaluation of DSMs in French and English. A total of 816 DSMs were constructed in 2,856 evaluations. The results obtained show a high correlation with human judgments about compound idiomaticity  (Spearman’s ρ=.82 in one dataset), indicating that these models are able to successfully detect idiomaticity.

Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Translation Technology

The Research Group in Computational Linguistics at the University of Wolverhampton (http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk) is currently recruiting a Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Translation Technology (permanent). The purpose of this post is to strengthen the research group by enhancing its research and publications in the field of translation technology. The appointed candidate will be expected to produce REF-returnable outputs, attract external income, seek industrial collaborations, teach at Masters level and supervise PhD students. He/she will join a recently appointed research fellow and two PhD students in translation technology. All these posts are part of a university investment in the area of translation technology.

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RGCL Staff Research Seminar

In November, Dr Constantin Orasan gave a staff research seminar profiling his current and future research user study on Quality estimation for professional translators.  The paper was well received and there was an interesting debate and questions afterwards.

Title:  Quality estimation for professional translators: a user study

Abstract: 

Postediting of machine translation output has became an important step of the workflows employed by translation companies. The idea behind postediting is that it is possible to improve the productivity of professional translators by asking them to correct the output of machine translation systems rather than to translate from scratch. In cases in which the quality of translation is poor this is not necessary true. The field of quality estimation could prove useful to decide which sentences can be postedited and which should be translated from scratch. This talk will report the results of a user study which recorded the productivity of four professional translators when they were asked to postedit and translate sentences in different scenarios.

Our results show that quality estimation information, when accurate, improves post-editing efficiency. The analysis has also raised a number of questions which are worth being investigated.