3 PhD studentships on NLP and DL approaches in Digital Humanities

Research Group in Computational Linguistics,

Research Institute of Information and Language Processing,

University of Wolverhampton

*** Closing date 19 July 2021 ***

The Research Group in Computational Linguistics (http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk) at the Research Institute of Information and Language Processing of the University of Wolverhampton invites applications

for three PhD studentships with the prospective PhD students working on the following topics: (i) Natural Language Processing (NLP) and Deep Learning (DL) in Computational History studies, (ii) NLP and DL in Computational Literature studies and (iii) NLP and DL in Computational Film Studies.

These are 3-year funded bursaries which will include a stipend towards living expenses (£15,609 per year) with the tuition fees and the research fees included.

Applicants will submit PhD research proposals not exceeding 2,000 words. The applicants are invited to propose an original computational history study, computational literature study or computational film study where NLP and DL techniques are employed.


Prerequisites

A successful applicant must have a good honours degree or equivalent in Computer Science, Computational Linguistics, Digital Humanities or Linguistics, with good programming skills, and knowledge of Deep Learning and Natural Language Processing.


Application procedure

Applications must include:

  • Research proposal not exceeding 2,000 words (see above)
  • A curriculum vitae listing degrees awarded, courses covered and marks obtained, publications, relevant experience and names of two referees who could be contacted for a reference
  • Cover letter with statement of research interests, outlining why you are interested in this PhD position/topic, how you plan to approach the research task and why you consider your experience is relevant.

Schedule

The application deadline is 19 July 2021. The short-listed candidates will be notified by email by 20 July 2021 and interviewed via Zoom on 21 or 22 July 2021. The starting date of the PhD position is 1 September 2021 or any time as soon as possible after that.

Established by Prof Mitkov in 1998, the research group in Computational Linguistics delivers cutting-edge research in a number of NLP areas. The results from the UK research assessment exercises confirm the research group in Computational Linguistics as one of the top performers in UK and international research with its research assessed as ‘internationally leading, internationally excellent and internationally recognised’.

The PhD students will be members of the newly established Responsible Digital Humanities Research Lab which is part of the Research Group of Computational Linguistics.


Applications should be sent by email to

Prof Dr Ruslan Mitkov

Director of Research Institute of Information and Language Processing

University of Wolverhampton

Email: R.Mitkov@wlv.ac.uk

and copied to Prof Mitkov’s PAs Miss Suman Hira (suman.hira@wlv.ac.uk) and Mrs April Harper (a.harper2@wlv.ac.uk)

Researchers’ Week – 2021

Researchers’ Week aims to provide postgraduate researchers with the opportunity to develop their research skills and knowledge development, as well as their networks with other researchers and their community of practice. 

This year the theme is ‘Vision 2030 – Developing our Research’, andResearchers’ week & ARC will once again take place online as we make the most out of our newfound skills of connecting virtually across the world.

Staff and students from any discipline and at any stage of research where invited to give a presentation that considers the theme, with a focus on Equality, Diversity & Inclusion, making Impact and addressing Societal Challenges within their own research or broader research area.

At the end of the week, all staff and students gathered for a virual award cermony to celebrate the achievements of our researchers and staff.

There were two nominations from RIILP. Professor Mitkov nomiated Tharindu Ranasinghe, one our PhD candiates and Suman nominated her colleagues Amanda, Kate and April on the Admin Team.

RCGL Seminars logo

Digital Humanities

Prof. Dr. Frederik Truyen, KU Leuven, Belgium.

28 June 2021

Title: Digitization of Heritage Collections: from inside-out to outside-in: the many facets of digital transitions.

Abstract:

In this talk we will address the challenges of digital transformation in the Cultural Heritage sector, starting from the example of digitizing photographic collections for Europeana. We will discuss how, starting from the actual digitization process of selected collections, a series of workflow transitions is inevitably set in motion that has a transformational impact, not only  on the way GLAM institutions operate, but how they rethink their core mission and their fundamental relationship with their audiences. We will highlight both technical as well as organizational and management challenges, and how this reveals the place and contribution of digital humanities research. 

Bio:

Fred Truyen is professor at the Faculty of Arts, KU Leuven. He publishes on Digitization of Heritage, Photography and E-Learning in the Humanities. He is in charge of the mediaLab CS Digital. He was involved in many projects on digitization of Cultural Heritage, such as EuropeanaPhotography (coordinator), Europeana Space (pilot leader) the Europeana DSI (aggregator for photography). Currently he is involved in the KU Leuven/FWO funded project Cornelia – a database for 17th century Art industries – and in the CEF Generic call for Europeana with the projects on Migration in the Arts and Sciences, Kaleidoscope: the 1950s in Europe, Europeana Common Culture and currently Europeana: Century of Change. He also participates in the H2020 projects Detect: Detecting Transcultural Identity in European Popular Crime Narratives and Indices. Moreover, he has a large experience in data modelling and metadata development for Image databases in the cultural-historical field. His main research focus is the digital transformation roadmap for Cultural Heritage Institutions. Prof. Truyen teaches the courses Online Publishing and Digital Cultural heritage in the MA Cultural Studies and the MA Digital Humanities at KU Leuven. He co-teaches in Cultural Economics and Cultural Policy. Prof. Truyen is board member of the Europeana Network Association and is active in the field of European policies on Digitization of Cultural Heritage. He is also a member of CLARIAH Flanders. He is the president of Photoconsortium, an association for the safeguard and promotion of photographic heritage.

RCGL Seminars logo

Technologies for Translation and Interpreting: Challenges and Latest Developments

Prof. Jan-Louis Kruger, Macquarie University.

18 June 2021

Title: Studying subtitle reading using eye tracking

Abstract:

The world of audiovisual media has changed on a scale last seen with the shift away from print to digital photography. VOD has moved from an expensive concept limited by technology and bandwidth, to the norm in most of not only the developed world, but also as an accelerated equaliser in developing countries. This has increased the reach and potential of audiovisual translation.

While the skills required to create AVT have come within reach of a large groups of practitioners due to advances in editing software and technology, with many processes from transcription to cuing being automated, research on the reception and processing of multimodal texts has also developed rapidly. This has given us new insights into the way viewers, for example, process the text of subtitles while also attending to auditory input as well as the rich visual code of film. This multimodality of film, although being acknowledged as one of the unique qualities of translation in this context, is also often overlooked in technological advances. When the emphasis is on the cheapest and simplest way of transferring spoken dialogue to written text, or visual scenes to auditory descriptions, the complex interplay between language and other signs is often overlooked.

Eye tracking provides a powerful tool for investigating the cognitive processing of viewers when watching subtitled film with research in this area drawing on cognitive science, psycholinguistics and psychology. I will present a brief description of eye tracking in AVT as well as the findings of some recent studies on subtitle reading at different subtitle presentation rates as well as in the presence of secondary visual tasks.

Bionote:

Jan-Louis Kruger is professor and Head of the Department of Linguistics at Macquarie University. He started his research career in English literature with a particular interest in the way in which Modernist poets and novelists manipulate language, and in the construction of narrative point of view. From there he started exploring the creation of narrative in film and how audiovisual translation (subtitling and audio description) facilitates the immersion of audiences in the fictional reality of film.

In the past decade his attention has shifted to the multimodal integration of language in video where auditory and visual sources of information supplement and compete with text in the processing of subtitles. His research uses eye tracking experiments (combined with psychometric instruments and performance measures) to investigate the cognitive processing of language in multimodal contexts. His current work looks at the impact of redundant and competing sources of information on the reading of subtitles at different presentation rates and in the presence of different languages.

RCGL Seminars logo

Digital Humanities

Prof. Alois Pichler, Wittgenstein Archives at the University of Bergen, Norway.

17 June 2021

Title: Wittgenstein Archives at the University of Bergen.

Abstract:

In the presentation part, I will give a short demo of the online resources and tools offered by the Wittgenstein Archives at the University of Bergen (WAB) for Wittgenstein research and digital humanists, including 

•             http://www.wittgensteinsource.org/ , BNE (static scholarly text- and facsimile edition of Wittgenstein’s Nachlass, incl. text search)

•             http://wittgensteinonline.no/ (dynamic and interactive scholarly text edition of Wittgenstein’s Nachlass)

•             http://wab.uib.no/cost-a32_xml/ (samples of WAB’s XML TEI transcriptions of Wittgenstein’s Nachlass)

•             http://wab.uib.no/sfb (semantic faceted search and browsing of Wittgenstein domain metadata)

•             http://wab.uib.no/cost-a32_philospace/wittgenstein.owl (part of WAB’s ontology for the Wittgenstein’s Nachlass)

•             http://wittfind.cis.lmu.de/ (tool for lemmatized and other advanced text search in Wittgenstein’s Nachlass, in cooperation with CIS from LMU Munich)

Bio:

Alois Pichler is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Bergen and Director of its Wittgenstein Archives. He is the author of several publications in the fields of Wittgenstein research and digital humanities. He is the current editor of the Wittgenstein Archives’ editions of Wittgenstein’s Nachlass and has initiated and curates open access Wittgenstein research platforms such as http://wittgensteinsource.org/ and http://wittgensteinonline.no/. Google scholar profile.

RCGL Seminars logo

Technologies for Translation and Interpreting: Challenges and Latest Developments

Prof. Jan-Louis Kruger, Macquarie University.

Title: Studying subtitle reading using eye tracking

18 June 2021

Abstract:

The world of audiovisual media has changed on a scale last seen with the shift away from print to digital photography. VOD has moved from an expensive concept limited by technology and bandwidth, to the norm in most of not only the developed world, but also as an accelerated equaliser in developing countries. This has increased the reach and potential of audiovisual translation.

While the skills required to create AVT have come within reach of a large groups of practitioners due to advances in editing software and technology, with many processes from transcription to cuing being automated, research on the reception and processing of multimodal texts has also developed rapidly. This has given us new insights into the way viewers, for example, process the text of subtitles while also attending to auditory input as well as the rich visual code of film. This multimodality of film, although being acknowledged as one of the unique qualities of translation in this context, is also often overlooked in technological advances. When the emphasis is on the cheapest and simplest way of transferring spoken dialogue to written text, or visual scenes to auditory descriptions, the complex interplay between language and other signs is often overlooked.

Eye tracking provides a powerful tool for investigating the cognitive processing of viewers when watching subtitled film with research in this area drawing on cognitive science, psycholinguistics and psychology. I will present a brief description of eye tracking in AVT as well as the findings of some recent studies on subtitle reading at different subtitle presentation rates as well as in the presence of secondary visual tasks.

Bionote:

Jan-Louis Kruger is professor and Head of the Department of Linguistics at Macquarie University. He started his research career in English literature with a particular interest in the way in which Modernist poets and novelists manipulate language, and in the construction of narrative point of view. From there he started exploring the creation of narrative in film and how audiovisual translation (subtitling and audio description) facilitates the immersion of audiences in the fictional reality of film.

In the past decade his attention has shifted to the multimodal integration of language in video where auditory and visual sources of information supplement and compete with text in the processing of subtitles. His research uses eye tracking experiments (combined with psychometric instruments and performance measures) to investigate the cognitive processing of language in multimodal contexts. His current work looks at the impact of redundant and competing sources of information on the reading of subtitles at different presentation rates and in the presence of different languages.